08.01.2020

How does a life skills approach in adult learning benefit participation?

A new policy paper, published in December, concludes EAEA’s thematic work on life skills in 2019. It outlines the key principles of a life skills approach and its potential for increasing participation levels, and offers a set of recommendations.

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Life skills are building blocks of independence and self-efficacy. They are combinations of different capabilities that enable adults to become lifelong learners and to solve problems in order to live an independent life and participate in society. EAEA strongly believes that a life skills approach in adult learning can benefit individuals, organisations and communities.

Recognizing the existing gaps and the potential of the Life Skills approach in addressing the societal and environmental challenges, EAEA has dedicated its attention in 2019 to exploring how such an approach can be taken up at different levels. Throughout the year, EAEA has collected innovative practices that foster life skills and awarded the best initiatives with the Grundtvig Award, carried out desk research and conducted study visits with a thematic focus on life skills.

The resulting paper analyses the three key principles of a life skills approach – a holistic perspective, learner-centredness and flexibility – and discusses how they could benefit participation levels in Europe. Illustrated with case studies and backed by recent studies, such as the findings of the GRALE IV, also published last December, the paper brings forward a set of recommendations targeting both providers and policy-makers on how to introduce life skills provision or implement elements of a life skills approach in adult learning to the benefit of learners and societies.

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Text: EAEAPhotos: Atstock Productions

16.01.2020 advocacy

The added value of non-formal adult learning: large differences in taxation of adult education in Europe

Over the past few years, there have been several initiatives by national and regional governments in EU countries to change the taxation of adult education. The exemption of non-formal adult education from the value-added tax is particularly controversial – as it is often argued by politicians that non-formal adult education is ‘leisure-time entertainment’ and is therefore not an activity in the public interest.

13.01.2020 advocacy

After the EU elections: what will the future of adult learning look like?

The new European Parliament and the new European Commission have started their work on the new portfolios in the second half of 2019. The European Union will have to take a clear direction on issues such as sustainability, democracy, and demographic changes. An EAEA working group explored these issues. The results were published in a background paper in December 2019.

08.01.2020 life skills

How does a life skills approach in adult learning benefit participation?

A new policy paper, published in December, concludes EAEA’s thematic work on life skills in 2019. It outlines the key principles of a life skills approach and its potential for increasing participation levels, and offers a set of recommendations.