LearnersMot aims at bringing more adults above 45 to learning through effective methodology and modern technology
02.08.2019

Low-educated adults and ICT: triggering primary motivation to learn

Even though the percentage of adults in education is growing every year, there is still a big group of people out of learning. As shown by statistics, normally the ones who are left out of education are the ones that need it the most – low-educated individuals, for whom education has become unobtainable not only due to their social and economic status but also due to inner barriers of fear and shame, and thus lack of motivation. The GRUNDTWIG AWARD 2019 participant, project LearnersMot, strives to help low-educated adults develop their primary motivation to get involved in learning through the use of ICT tools and modern teaching methods. In the following interview, Ana Herranz from Edensol, Spain, told us more about the project.

What was the main purpose of this project?
“The main purpose of the Erasmus+KA204 project “How to Trigger Primary Motivation for Learning in Low Educated Adults Using ICT Tools” is to offer adult educators resources and construct with them knowledge and skills needed for working with low-educated and low-skilled adult learners to trigger their primary motivation for learning.
So far, a resource library has been set up, a conceptional background has been developed and a blended online “Deep In: Core literacy course” has been elaborated, an educational film has been produced with the main aim of enabling adult educators to better motivate the learners to enrol and remain in education, using situational learning based on life skills.”

The main outcome of the project are the professional skills of adult educators reinforced through sharing experiences, good practices, reflection, awareness and inspiration.

How did the project foster the life skills approach?
“The essential aim of this project is to enable adult educators as well as employers and managers to identify, understand and support low-educated functionally illiterate employees.
Developing literacy is closely related to developing integrated basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, cognitive, cultural, communication and team-building skills, as well as the ability to efficiently use ICT tools.
The project targets adult educators’ need to foster their learners’ life skills through developing their  language and communication skills for everyday life and workplace.”

There is no literacy without skills; skills cannot be taught separately but have to be integrated.

What was the best practice learnt from this project that you want to share?
“There is no literacy without skills; skills cannot be taught separately but have to be integrated. Skills are to be taught using a variety of channels, they should be used and reused many times. Adults in the situation of illiteracy need to learn how to learn using ICT tools.
From a professional point of view, teaching low-educated adults is understanding the power of learning by doing, group learning, relationships, and community building. It helps adult educators appreciate the transformative value of learning deepening their respect for their learners’ talents and potentials in all spheres of life.”

All intellectual outputs have been developed collaboratively by all partners.

LearnersMot

Category: European projects
Coordinator: Edensol
Country: Organisations from Spain, Italy, Slovenia, and Cyprus.
Focus: Adult educators’ professional development
Life Skills approach: Increasing low-educated adults’ motivation to involve in education for wider career opportunities
Resources: website

Text: Aizhana KhasanovaPhotos: Project partners

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